The US Army made a huge public blunder after it tweeted five fatal words on social media.

“How has serving impacted you?” the agency posted to Twitter just before Memorial Day.

Needless to say, the internet answered the call in a predictable fashion, effectively “breaking” the US Army’s Twitter account with tales that would scare off any potential recruit.

While there were several heartwarming and encouraging accounts of how the US Army benefitted some veterans, the most popular accounts -which largely appear to come from family members of Army veterans- weren’t so positive.

“It got me addicted to pain meds then heroin and alcohol,” SFC Matthew Haley tweeted.

Many stories dated back even further, albeit being from the children and grandchildren of veterans.

“My father returned from Vietnam Nam with PTSD,” user Omgnogi wrote. “He drank himself to death, but not before inflicting irreparable damage on his wife and kids.”

“My grandpops was a machine gunner in Korea,” Thomas A. Fink commented. “He hated cats because of their eyes and never wanted to talk about it.”

A veteran smiles as he sleeps under a blanket with an image of a DD form 214 printed on it. (aafnation.com)


“Found my mother in the closet after her tour in Afghanistan with a knife, she’s still afraid of firework sounds,” Nathan Tyler wrote. “It’s impacted me because my mom won’t ever be the same mentally. So thanks for that.”

Interestingly enough, a considerable number of tweets were from Navy veterans, who either got lost while cruising the internet or simply had nowhere else to vent. Unfortunately, a considerable percentage of Navy veteran tweets involved being sexually abused.

“My Chief Sexually Assaulted 5 of us (Probably others as well) and he got away with it,” user Milkykaja wrote.

“My father was sexually assaulted by his superiors in the Navy in the forties back when there was no way to seek justice,” L. Dale responded. “He went on to molest me from [an] infant until I got my period.”

Some, such as user TheHartTech, claimed they were perpetually hypervigilant and even went so far to acknowledge it is a matter of time before they do something rash.

“I’m constantly aware of my surroundings, and assessing threats,” he wrote. “I forget what I’m doing, and who I am sometimes. I want to die, but logically know that is just my trauma. I fight to stay upright every day, and I’m losing that battle.”

So, the real question of the week: how has serving impacted you?

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