Senator Rand Paul is suggesting an end to the 17-year war in Afghanistan- and a hefty chunk of change for all who served in the Global War on Terror.

The senator from Kentucky made an announcement on Tuesday, outlining his intent to introduce legislation “to end a war that should have ended a long time ago.”

“I supported going to war in Afghanistan in 2001, attacking those who harbored the 9/11 terrorists or helped to organize the attack…and going after al-Qaeda,” Paul said in a video on his Facebook page. “But we are many, many years past that mission. We have turned to nation-building at the cost of more than $50 billion spent a year in Afghanistan.”

For Senator Paul, time is up, and it’s time to stop wasting American lives, money and resources.

“It’s important when to know to declare victory and leave a war,” he added. “I think that time is long past, but I think we can all agree that time has come.”

Unrolling the AFGHAN Service Act, Paul’s plan would pull the troops back to the homeland for a rebuilding of the military and pay out a “victory bonus” of $2,500 to every servicemember who played their part in the Global War on Terror, from 2001 to present.

For the three million servicemembers who have deployed as part of the Global War on Terror, the payouts would total around $7 billion, which is a cheap “peace dividend” in Paul’s own words.

In short, Paul believes the job is done, and it’s time to leave.

“Osama bin Laden was killed eight years ago … [and Pentagon officials] say al-Qaeda is nearly wiped out,” he said.

The United States invaded Afghanistan on 7 October, 2001, with the mission to dismantle al-Qaeda, capture Osama bin Laden and remove the power base of the Taliban.

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