North Korea threatens war with South over loudspeakers

Members of South Korean conservative group burn an effigy of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and North Korea's flag during a rally denouncing the North Korea at the Imjingak Pavilion near the border village of Panmunjom, which has separated the two Koreas since the Korean War, in Paju, north of Seoul, South Korea, Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2015. South Korea restarted propaganda broadcasts across the border with rival North Korea on Monday for the first time in 11 years in retaliation for the North allegedly planting land mines last week that maimed two South Korean soldiers. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

North Korea threatened war on South Korea in retaliation for propaganda loudspeakers in the border region.

In an “open warning” issued by the North Korean military’s front-line command, the country said it will launch “indiscriminate strikes” if the South does not stop propaganda broadcasts in demilitarized zones.

The threat comes after Korean leader Kim Jong Un and the country’s National Defense Commission denied responsibility for Aug. 4 mine blasts that injured two South Korean soldiers.

“The resumption of the broadcasting is a direct action of declaring a war against the (Democratic People’s Republic of Korea),” the Front Command of the Korean People’s Army said in a statement released by the Korean Central News Agency.

Members of South Korean conservative group burn an effigy of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and North Korea's flag during a rally denouncing the North Korea at the Imjingak Pavilion near the border village of Panmunjom, which has separated the two Koreas since the Korean War, in Paju, north of Seoul, South Korea, Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2015. South Korea restarted propaganda broadcasts across the border with rival North Korea on Monday for the first time in 11 years in retaliation for the North allegedly planting land mines last week that maimed two South Korean soldiers. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)
Members of South Korean conservative group burn an effigy of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and North Korea’s flag during a rally denouncing the North Korea at the Imjingak Pavilion near the border village of Panmunjom, which has separated the two Koreas since the Korean War, in Paju, north of Seoul, South Korea, Tuesday, Aug. 11, 2015. South Korea restarted propaganda broadcasts across the border with rival North Korea on Monday for the first time in 11 years in retaliation for the North allegedly planting land mines last week that maimed two South Korean soldiers. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

“If they turn down the demand of the DPRK, it would start an all-out military action of justice to blow up all means for ‘anti-North psychological warfare’ in all areas along the front.”

South Korean President Park Geun Hye said she will “sternly” deal with any North Korean provocation.

“North Korea should wake up from the illusion of maintaining its regime with provocations and threats,” she said Saturday in a speech marking the anniversary of liberation from Japan’s colonial rule. “Provocations and threats will only bring isolation and destruction. But if North Korea joins the path of dialogue and cooperation, it will get a chance to develop its economy and improve people’s livelihoods.”

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