Declassified CIA files says the Army sent intelligence officers to planet Mars 1 million years ago

This low-angle self-portrait of NASA's Curiosity Mars rover shows the vehicle at the site from which it reached down to drill into a rock target called "Buckskin." The MAHLI camera on Curiosity's robotic arm took multiple images on Aug. 5, 2015. IMAGE CREDIT: NASA/JPL-CALTECH/MSSS .

The 1980s were arguably one of the most awesome eras in the past few decades, and 1984 was no exception. The economy was booming, Hollywood was releasing one hit film after another, Reagan was planning to roll back the Soviet Union, the last A-10 Thunderbolt IIs ever made were rolling off the assembly line with new paint, and the US Army was sending people to Mars- 1 million years in the past.

If that last part has you curious, then you’re in luck- that’s the topic of today’s story: the curious, declassified case of “Project Center Lane.”  Center Lane was one of many similar projects that went by various code names, such as GONDOLA WISH, GRILL FLAME, SUN STREAK, SCANAT. In 1991 they were consolidated into one project called “Stargate Project” – best known for its portrayal in the 2004 book and 2009 film entitled The Men Who Stare at Goats.

The United States Army dabbled in the idea of psychic experimentation in the name of waging better warfare, some time around the late 1970s (which was a weird time in itself) until the early 1990s.

The Stargate Project was terminated in 1995 and some parts were declassified but it was not until 2000 that detailed reports from “Center Lane” were released.

That takes us back to May 22, 1984, when the Army was so interested in the supernatural that they sent intelligence officers on paid work trips to a remote institute that specialized in such phenomena.

According to one of the declassified CIA files– a US Army test subject at the institue was able to travel through time under the watchful eye of his monitor, transporting his mind to Mars in the year 1 million B.C.

The experiment, a joint venture between the US Army Operational Group (known as the AOG, which disbanded in 1995) and Monroe Institute, the subject was given a series of coordinates (not knowing they were to Mars) and subjected to a series of binaural audio patterns in order to “synchronize the hemispheres of the brain” (known as Hemi-Sync). Using those coordinates, the soldier had to describe what he saw.

Going back in time, the soldier allegedly saw a once flourishing Mars, complete with pyramids, obelisks and a tall alien race of “ancient people” with an affinity for fitted silk clothing- and a quandary they could not escape.

“They’re ancient people,” he remarked in the notes. “They’re dying. It’s past their time or age. They’re very philosophic about it. They’re looking for a way to survive and they just can’t.”

The aliens and their civilization were reportedly killed off by geological events, according to the transcripts.

At one point, the intelligence officer reports going into a hibernation chamber, where the Martians sheltered from storms.

When asked to inquire as to why the Martians were dying, they reportedly were looking for another planet to live on after a cataclysmic event compromised Mars.

“All I get is that they must just wait. Doesn’t know who I am. Think he perceives I’m a hallucination or something,” the soldier said when asked by his monitor if there was any way the soldier could help the Martians with their predicament and if the Martian knew who he was.

While the case seems strange, it wasn’t terribly uncommon: the US Military apparently had a lot of interest in the supernatural, and may still retain that interest to this day. Who knows ? In the next thirty years, you may just hear about some crazy experiment that happened last week.

After all, it is the US Army we’re talking about.

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